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The cover of the "Furman Hornet" dated May 3, 1918

This digital collection contains copies of the Furman University student newspaper publications: The Furman Hornet (1916-1961) as well as issues of Furman's current newspaper, The Paladin, from 1961-1982. More current issues of the Paladin will be added in the near future.

The Georgetown County Hurricane Collection exhibits photographs that record the many hurricanes that have impacted coastal South Carolina. Hurricane Hazel (1954) and Hurricane Hugo (1989) were two of the most powerful storms that impacted South Carolina. These photographs document the devastation and the impact of these two hurricanes that will never be forgotten by the residents of Georgetown County

The Georgetown County Library Photograph Collection is compiled of photographs of individuals who lived in Georgetown County in the late 19th and early 20th century. Names such as LaBruce, Ehrich, Sampson, Ward, and Gasque make up this unique collection of photographs that have been donated to the Georgetown County Library

The Georgetown County Museum Collection exhibits photographs from families, plantations and other images from Georgetown County locals. The black and white images offer a rare glimpse in the lifestyle of Georgetown County in the first half of the twentieth century. Photos come from the Butler, Brightman and Harriet Morgan families, Caledonia Plantation, Lark Hill Plantation and the 1960s Highway 17 expansion. For more information visit http://www.georgetowncountymuseum.com/

The 20th Century Newspaper Collection spans from 1902-1999. Titles include: The Georgetown Daily Item (1907-1912), The Sunday Outlook (1902-1912), The Carolina Field (1905), The Georgetown Times (1905-1999), The Andrews News (1949) and The Daily Item (1912).        

The Georgetown County Postcard Collection features postcards that show many historic buildings and street scenes from the Georgetown area. Many of the postcards were used for advertising purposes and provide a glimpse into life in Georgetown in the early 1900s.

Gordon R. Hennigar Pathology Museum Collection

The Gordon R. Hennigar Pathology Museum Collection features photographs of gross pathology specimens from the Museum's holdings. The photograph collection is the result of a collaboration between the Waring Historical Library and MUSC Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (DPLM) to preserve, document, and make the wet specimen collection more accessible. Dr. Erin Presnell of DPLM says, "This is a wonderful solution to the preservation of the vast collection of gross pathology specimens collected and maintained in the DPLM Gordon Hennigar Museum over the past several decades.

Gregg portrait

This photograph collection is a small portion of USC Aiken's historical Gregg-Graniteville Archive of documents and memorabilia of the Graniteville Company, a major Southern textile manufacturing firm founded in 1845 by William Gregg. The archive represents the only collection in existence devoted to William Gregg and the Graniteville Company. It was developed over the years by the executives of the company at its main office in the village of Graniteville.

Housed in the Archives of the Chester County Historical Society, the Henry O. Nichols collection contains an estimated 250,000(+) images taken by Mr. Nichols (1900–1991) over a span of 79 years (1911–1990). The Collection depicts images of everyday life, from birth to death, in and around Chester County, South Carolina as well as examples of Mr.

Historic Charleston Foundation Tours of Homes

One of the first fundraising programs developed by Historic Charleston Foundation after its incorporation in 1947 was its annual spring tours of historic houses, during which trained “hostesses” would guide visitors through several private homes in Charleston’s historic district. In addition to raising revenue to support Historic Charleston Foundation’s preservation efforts, the tours performed an educational function by presenting Charleston architecture and decorative arts to both visitors and residents alike.

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