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African Americans Seen Through the Eyes of the Newsreel Cameraman

Fox News and Fox Movietone News camera crews covered the people and events of the country and, indeed, the world.  From 1919 to 1963 these journalists aimed their viewfinders at the mundane and the spectacular.

The resulting images—most of which still exist as camera negatives at Moving Image Research Collections—provide an unparalleled opportunity to glimpse the world through their eyes.

The Andrews Museum Collection features photographs taken of the century old town of Andrews, South Carolina. Founded in 1909, Andrews was formed when the towns of Rosemary and Harpers merged. Known for its railway lines and lumber mills, Andrews quickly became a town that had a lot to offer. Churches, retail stores, movie theaters and more were built as the town grew.

The Andrews Museum is located in the Old Town Hall and offers visitors a chance to see life in 1909 Andrews, South Carolina.

One of America’s foremost early twentieth-century African-American magic acts. J. Hartford Armstrong, his wife, Lille Belle Armstrong, and eventually their daughter, Ellen Armstrong, performed feats that included mind reading, slight of hand, and card tricks. This collection of 127 items includes letters, photographs, and newspaper clippings.

The Belle W. Baruch Collection features photographs provided by the Belle W. Baruch Foundation. In 1905, Bernard M. Baruch purchased and merged 11 former plantations as a winter hunting retreat calling it Hobcaw Barony. Today, Hobcaw includes 17,500 acres of research reserve left by his daughter Belle W. Baruch and is one of the few undeveloped tracts of land on the Waccamaw Neck.

This collection includes images of the Baruch family, their friends and guest at Hobcaw, as well as their extensive travels around the world. Photograph descriptions were provided by Lee Brockington.

Broadsides

Broadsides is a virtual collection of posters from many different collections at the South Caroliniana Library.

statue of man on horse called "Riders of the Dawn"

The Brookgreen Gardens Collection includes photographs from the archives of Archer and Anna Huntington who established Brookgreen Gardens in 1931. The couple designed the gardens to preserve the native flora and fauna as well as display sculptures by Anna and other artists in a natural setting. Many of the photographs include features of the garden, Murrells Inlet residents and photographs taken by North Carolina photographer, Bayard Wooten. For more information on Brookgreen Gardens visit their website: brookgreen.org.

The Caines Family Photograph Collection exhibits the history of the family, from their life at Clambank to the more recent duck decoy carvings completed by Jerry and Roy Caines. Residents of Georgetown County since the early eighteenth century, the collection includes photographs of both the Caines Brothers and Caines Boys, both known as decoy carvers, fishermen and experts on local waterways.

 

Carolina Student Handbook

The Carolina Student’s Handbook offers a glimpse of the campus culture at the University of South Carolina from the 1920s through the 1940s. Published annually by the University’s YMCA and YWCA chapters, it was primarily aimed at freshman, and included information on the honor code, campus traditions, songs, organizations, athletics, and more. The handbook also urged students to shop at the local businesses that advertised in the handbook.

aerial photo of textile mill

The Carolina Textile Mills Collection provides photographs, maps, blueprints, ephemera, letters, guidebooks and more documenting textile mill history in Upstate South Carolina from various textile mill related collections held by the Clemson University Special Collections unit. Images in this collection were taken from the M. Lowenstein collection, the Neil Campbell collection, the Dill Family collection, the Clifton Manufacturing collection, the Henry Cater collection and the JP Stevens collection.

Charleston Museum Civil War Photographs

These images are from the Charleston Museum's collection of civil war photographs and are primarily stereographs.

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