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South Carolina Historical Society Manuscripts

Selections from the manuscript collection of South Carolina Historical Society. The first addition to this collection is a journal written by Peter Timothy during the Revolutionary War, detailing troop activities in Charleston.

image of boy reading a book

This beautifully illustrated alphabet book, published in 1775, is an excellent example of early children’s literature from the eighteenth century. Produced by copperplate engraving, the book originally sold plain at 9d. (9 pence) or hand-colored at 1s6d (1 shilling, 6 pence). Published by William Tringham of London, this copy was probably sold plain and colored later. The reproduction method, which was relatively expensive at the time, was also used by the great late eighteenth-century children’s publisher John Newberry.

Medical Society of South Carolina Digital Collections

The Medical Society of South Carolina was founded in 1789. The collection includes the society's minutes as well as portraits of MSSC Presidents.

USC Medical School Historical Collections

This collection gives an indication of the kinds and numbers of medical books in the hands of physicians in South Carolina and reflects the education and training of doctors during the 18th and 19th centuries.

manuscript

The Wilkinson-Keith Family Papers consist of correspondence and other documents among the Wilkinson, Keith, Siegling, Haskell, and Marshall families and their friends dating from 1785 to 1920. The bulk of the correspondence dates from 1820 to 1890, a large portion of which chronicles Willis Keith’s experiences as a Confederate soldier in 1862-1863. Antebellum correspondence discusses Charleston fires, great details of family illnesses and their cures, plantation life (more specifically, destruction/endurance of crops and treatment of slaves), and general details about everyday life.

William Ancrum Papers

 
Formerly owned by wealthy Charleston merchant William Ancrum (ca. 1722-1808), this single volume (171 pages, bound in vellum) contains both a letter book and financial accounts that reflect the financial impact of the American Revolution on this South Carolina businessman and planter.

William Tennent III

The journal covers Tennent's trek though the S.C. back-country, at times in the company of William Henry Drayton and Rev. Oliver Hart in an effort to persuade Loyalist Tories to join the Patriot cause. The album contains papers documenting his life as a Presbyterian minister in the Colonies of New Jersey and Connecticut, the courtship of his wife despite the objections of her mother, and his 1772 arrival in Charleston, S.C., to serve the Independent or Congregational Church among other topics.

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