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forward together painted landscape image

Forward Together is a multiple-venue project, developed by a consortium of historical and educational institutions, that focuses on the participation of South Carolina during World War I and its effects on the state. Through exhibitions, public lectures, and the development of curricula, this project gives the community a better understanding of the twentieth century’s economic, political, and social issues that are embedded in the legacy of the Great War and continue to reverberate throughout regional, national, and international communities.

The Frederick E. Kredel, M.D. Papers document the professional life of Dr. Kredel, MUSC's first full-time professor of surgery. The collection includes awards, certificates, and honors received by Dr. Kredel, correspondence, and speeches given by Dr. Kredel. The highlight of the collection is Dr. Kredel's scrapbook of his 1925 zoological research trip to Kartabo, British Guiana, where he studies sloths.

Ernest F. Hollings

Fritz Hollings: In His Own Words is a collection of Senator Hollings’ writings, speeches, photographs, and audio files from his days as Lt. Governor, Governor, and U.S. Senator. 200 items showcase the compelling intellect, keen wit, and, at times, sharp tongue that Senator Hollings was known for in South Carolina and on Capitol Hill.

A cougar

The Furman Cougar Project began in 2008 as an effort to monitor and research cougars in south-central New Mexico. Each summer Furman University Biology professor, Dr. Travis Perry, and his students travel to Sierra County New Mexico to photograph and track the large wild cats. The research team sets up a grid of cameras in key locations that are programmed to snap a photograph of any movement. The cameras help the team identify potential locations of the cougars. When a cougar’s location is identified, the team then safely captures, tags, and collars it with a GPS locator.

ROTC cadet wearing a helmet and wielding a rifle

The Furman University Department of Military Science was organized in the fall of 1950 as an Armored Cavalry ROTC Unit. In 1953 the General Military Science curriculum was adopted which provided each ROTC cadet with the necessary military background to lead to a commission in any of the fifteen branches of the Army.

This digital collection contains photographs, pamphlets, and other materials on the history of the Army ROTC at Furman beginning in the 1960s.

A little boy holding a football

The glass plate negatives in this digital collection are housed in Special Collections and Archives Department at Furman University. The images represent subjects at both Furman University and the Greenville Woman's College from 1915-1933. The majority of the photographs date from 1928-1932. Popular subjects in the collection include: the Greenville Woman's College Glee Club, the Furman football team, the Furman band, May Day celebrations, and profile photographs of individual faculty members and students.

A construction worker

This digital collection contains nearly 350 photographs of the new campus of Furman University located at 3300 Poinsett Highway in Greenville, South Carolina. The photographs date from 1950-1962, and showcase the creation of the new campus including the construction of buildings, and the transition period from the downtown campuses of Furman University and Greenville Woman's College.

Richard Furman Hall. 1929

This digital collection contains over 2,000 photographs of the old main campus of Furman University located in downtown Greenville, South Carolina along the Reedy River. Images span over 100 years, from 1851 until 1958 when this location closed down due to its relocation to 3300 Poinsett Highway. Popular topics in the collection include: athletics, student organizations, theatrical performances, and the Furman University band.

photo of building in Charleston, SC

This collection of glass plate negatives of Charleston and Summerville was made by George LaGrange Cook in the 1880s and early 1890s. The son of the famous Civil War photographer, George Smith Cook, LaGrange learned the art of photography from his father. He lived in Charleston and then Summerville before leaving around 1892 to join his father in Richmond, Virginia.

 

George W. Johnson Photographs

George W. Johnson took photographs of Charleston buildings and people at the turn of the 20th century. His collection also includes a number of photographs of the 1901-1902 South Carolina Inter-state and West Indian Exhibition.

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