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image of smokey the bear and children at library checkout

The South Carolina State Library and the South Carolina Digital Library present the South Carolina Children's Library Services Collection, a collection of historical and contemporary images from the 1940s-2000s relating to library services for children. 

The photographs are from the archives of the South Carolina State Library and many were taken by State Library field agents. Portrayed in photographs are youth at public libraries, summer reading programs, other children's programs, and displays.

watercolor caricature of military officer

This World War I soldier's sketchbook is the mark of Cpl. Douglas G. Ward, an otherwise unknown British soldier-artist. Douglas G. Ward entered the military and trained at Catterick Camp, the infantry training center and was assigned to the 7th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment which was part of the 33rd Brigade, 11th (Northern) Division, landing at Sulva Bay (Gallipoli) 7th August 1915.

Albert Simons Papers, 1908-1977

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Sketches of buildings and architectural features in Europe, Maryland, Turkey, Italy, Greece, France, South Carolina, and Spain, by Charleston architect Albert Simons.  Also included are sketches during his military service in Europe during World War I. The images depict buildings of France, and soldiers and civilians of many nationalities.

Alice Ravenel Huger Smith Collection

The Alice Ravenel Huger Smith Collection contains the book, Twenty Drawings of the Pringle House (1917). This book was a collaboration with her father, D.E. Huger Smith. Alice R. Huger Smith (1876-1958), was part of the Charleston Renaissance and is remembered as a painter, printmaker, author, illustrator, historian and historic preservationist.

Allen University Graduating Class of 1896

Allen University has a rich and distinguished history. Founded in 1870 by the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, the institution represents the dream of Daniel Alexander Payne (1811-1883), an apostle of black education in the United States, who saw the need for such a school among African Americans.  Payne’s dream was fulfilled by Richard Allen, AME church clergy and laymen.
 

American Spinning Company

Contains photographs of the mill, village, and people of the American Spinning Company from the private collection of Robert "Bob" H. Duke of Greenville. Organized in 1895 by Oscar Sampson, James Orr, and Jacob Cagle American Spinning Company began as a two-story wooden building, but grew rapidly adding a new brick building and other additions by the turn of the century. Despite changing hands several times over the decades, the mill continued its operation until June 27th, 1990. The mill building still stands today, however a majority of the village was razed.

The Andrews Museum Collection features photographs taken of the century old town of Andrews, South Carolina. Founded in 1909, Andrews was formed when the towns of Rosemary and Harpers merged. Known for its railway lines and lumber mills, Andrews quickly became a town that had a lot to offer. Churches, retail stores, movie theaters and more were built as the town grew.

The Andrews Museum is located in the Old Town Hall and offers visitors a chance to see life in 1909 Andrews, South Carolina.

One of America’s foremost early twentieth-century African-American magic acts. J. Hartford Armstrong, his wife, Lille Belle Armstrong, and eventually their daughter, Ellen Armstrong, performed feats that included mind reading, slight of hand, and card tricks. This collection of 127 items includes letters, photographs, and newspaper clippings.

Beaty Family Collection

The Beaty Family Scrapbook contains images of the family during their time spent in Murrells Inlet during the years 1908-1915. The family purchased the Hermitage in 1905 and spent many happy days fishing and swimming in the inlet.

The Belle W. Baruch Collection features photographs provided by the Belle W. Baruch Foundation. In 1905, Bernard M. Baruch purchased and merged 11 former plantations as a winter hunting retreat calling it Hobcaw Barony. Today, Hobcaw includes 17,500 acres of research reserve left by his daughter Belle W. Baruch and is one of the few undeveloped tracts of land on the Waccamaw Neck.

This collection includes images of the Baruch family, their friends and guest at Hobcaw, as well as their extensive travels around the world. Photograph descriptions were provided by Lee Brockington.

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