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engraved image of Phillis Wheatley sitting at writing desk

The poems of Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784) are read and studied by students and scholars in a variety of disciplines (American literature, African-American Studies, African Studies, and Women’s Studies), but the first edition has not previously been freely accessible in a digital facsimile without a fee or subscription. Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (London, 1773) is the first book published by an African-American author, and the frontispiece portrait of Wheatley is the only surviving work by the African-American slave artist Scipio Moorhead (born ca. 1750).

wood engraving of mill on riverside

During the late 19th century the discovery of phosphate deposits in the Charleston and Florence areas marked the beginning of a rapidly growing industry in South Carolina. Phosphates are rocks formed from the fossilized remains of sea creatures found in areas once covered by oceans. In South Carolina, phosphates were used as fertilizers to extend the life of crops. Freedmen flocked toward the industry seeking employment, and with the financial support of Northern financiers, Carolina farmers began production of this highly sought-after material.

page from reniniscences

Charles Crosland (1845-1918), who served in the 19th South Carolina Cavalry Battalion, with Company H of the Confederate Army's Hampton Legion, recounts his combat experiences, his father's death, and the destruction of the Crosland family plantation in Bennetsville. He also references the sinking of the USS Housatonic by the Confederate submarine, the H.L. Hunley. Lula Crosland Ricaud later reproduced the book in part in her Family of Edward and Ann Snead Crosland, published in 1958.

Richard L. Walker

Dixie Walker dedicated his life and career to intercultural understanding and he utilized his knowledge of East Asia in his work at home and abroad. He taught in numerous prestigious institutions as a professor of international studies before joining the faculty of the University of South Carolina in 1957. He founded the Institute of International Studies at USC in 1961.

black and white photograph of an observatory

In 2011 Robert B. Ariail donated an extraordinary collection of historical astronomy to the University of South Carolina and the South Carolina State Museum. Over the past half-century, Mr. Ariail built a collection that encompassed both historic telescopes and astronomical instruments, now at the State Museum, and more than 5,000 rare books and other published items, now housed in the University's Irvin Department of Rare Books & Special Collections.

portrait of Samuel Lander

Samuel Lander, Jr. was born in Lincolnton, North Carolina, of Irish parents who had immigrated to America in 1818. He devoted his life to education and the ministry.  He graduated as valedictorian from Randolph-Macon College (then in Boydton, VA) in 1852. For a short time he practiced civil engineering and studied law. In December of 1853 he married Laura Ann McPherson.

woodcut illustration of a woman sitting at a writing desk

The University of South Carolina libraries have been acquiring works by Scottish authors since the early nineteenth century. With the addition of the extensive G. Ross Roy Collection in 1989, South Carolina now has major research holdings across a wide range of Scottish writing. Indeed, in the words of one recent visitor, it is "the best Burns collection in North America."

Septima P. Clark Papers, ca. 1910-ca. 1990

View the Collection

This scrapbook contains images, newspaper clippings, and correspondence from the life of Septima P. Clark, a Charleston educator and civil rights activist.

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