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Berkeley Photographs

Once part of an album, the photographs (circa 1900) show plantations, African Americans, horses, hunting, rice threshing, wagons and carts, and churches in Berkeley County, S.C. Some featured landmarks are: Medway, Wappahoola, Mulberry Castle, Dean Hall (bulk of collection,) Dockon, Bushy Park, Exeter, Cote Bas, Bippy, Lewisfield, Strawberry Chapel, Strawberry ferry, and pine land house. People who are identified in the photographs include Col. Jim Petigru Carson, S.P. Stoney, and the Stoney family.

Beulah Glover Photographs

In about 1937 Miss Beulah Glover (17 Aug. 1887 – 4 Jan. 1991) opened a photography studio in Walterboro, S.C. Being also an historian, Miss Glover shot many historical scenes in the Lowcountry. She converted some of these images to postcards and sold them in her studio, Foto-Nook. She also used images to illustrate her many articles and books on the history of Colleton County. Miss Glover worked also as photo-journalist, selling her images to the Walterboro newspaper. This small sampling of images by Miss Glover includes prints and negatives and covers the years 1941 to 1952.

Charleston Earthquake, 1886

On August 31, 1886, Charleston and surrounding towns suffered extensive damage from the largest earthquake to ever hit the southeast. The photographs in this collection show the aftermath of the earthquake shortly after it occurred. George LaGrange Cook, a prominent Charleston photographer created the series "Cook's Earthquake Views of Charleston and Vicinity" which featured a total of 200 photographs that could be purchased as souvenirs. A portion of this series, along with earthquake photographs from photographers William Wilson, W.H. Fairchild, J.H.

Columbia, SC Historical Digital Collections

The following digital collections represent a broad picture of the history of Columbia, South Carolina, from the 1800s to the end of the twentieth century. A special thanks to the City of Columbia, Richland Library, USC Libraries, South Carolina State Museum, South Carolina State Library, and the South Carolina Department of Archives and History for making these collections available online.

photo of football player

E. Don Herd created these negatives while a student at Belton High School, Belton, S.C. and a few later while at Erskine College. Subjects include Belton and Easley high schools athletic teams, clubs, class officers, and homecoming. Community life is also exhibited through negatives of the Belton City Council, businesses, churches, weddings, reunions, portraits, Christmas parades, Scout troops, and a trip to Cuba.

Burson Photographs

E.E. Burson worked as a photographer in Denmark, South Carolina, and the surrounding areas of Bamberg County approximately between the years of 1905 and 1920. Burson not only worked in his Denmark studio, but he also photographed town scenes and nearby Voorhees College. Burson’s work is notable because he captured images of both white and African-American townspeople.

woman on horse drawn carriage

E. T. Start of New York State moved to Camden, South Carolina in 1903, as the photographer at the Kirkwood Hotel. Photographing the Winter Colony and local scenes, he spent time in Camden until c. 1945. This collection of 200 photographs includes images of people, animals, and houses in Camden, S.C., in particular horse-drawn vehicles, horseback riding, polo, the house "Bohemia," and much more.

Fall Line Collection

The Fall Line is a geographic region within South Carolina where the rivers are no longer navigable from the Low Country. This area, which stretches from Cheraw on the Pee Dee River to Hamburg (present day North Augusta) on the Savannah River, yielded experiences and material culture that were characteristic of its peoples. The goods Fall Line citizens made, bought, sold, and used revealed the manner in which they negotiated their surroundings, met their needs, and formed their aspirations.

photo of building in Charleston, SC

This collection of glass plate negatives of Charleston and Summerville was made by George LaGrange Cook in the 1880s and early 1890s. The son of the famous Civil War photographer, George Smith Cook, LaGrange learned the art of photography from his father. He lived in Charleston and then Summerville before leaving around 1892 to join his father in Richmond, Virginia.

 

Harbison Agricultural College

Harbison Agricultural College began in 1885 when the Rev. Emory W. Williams of Washington, D.C. founded a school to educate young African Americans in Abbeville, S.C. It was named Ferguson Academy in honor of one of its benefactors, Rev. James H. Ferguson of the Presbyterian Church in Hanover, N.J.

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