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image of soldier dreaming of family back home during war

Postcards were a popular and inexpensive means of keeping in touch during the Great War. In addition, they boosted morale, encouraged patriotism, and served as an important propaganda tool. Designs included national themes, political cartoons, patriotic imagery, and humorous and sentimental messages. Photographic postcards depicted every aspect of the war from soldiers training to battlefield scenes, the machinery of war, and its devastation, and scenes from the home front. Postcards often featured patriotic imagery, humorous themes, and sentimental messages.

poster image of soldier with headline: Help Stop This

The posters in this digital collection represent only one small part of the Joseph M. Bruccoli Great War Collection at the University of South Carolina. The Collection was established in 1997 by Matthew J. and Arlyn Bruccoli in memory of Joseph M. Bruccoli, Matthew J. Bruccoli's father, who fought in the first World War. While the majority of the posters in the collection are American, the collection also includes British, French, and German posters, along with a few posters from Austria, Canada, Italy, and Russia.

K12 Primary Resources Pilot

In collaboration with a pilot group of South Carolina teachers, USC Libraries has made these primary resources available online with the SC Social Studies Standards.

engraved image of cherub and wreath of flowers

The illustrated annual giftbook is one of the most distinctive publishing genres on both sides of the Atlantic, from the mid-1820s through to the 1850s. In 1823, the British published Rudolph Ackerman issued what is usually recognized as the first annual, the Forget-Me-Not, an almanac with poems and engravings, issued in a small format in papercovered boards in a printed slipcase. Ackerman's innovation was soon imitated by others: Friendship's Offering (from 1824), the Literary Souvenir (from 1825), The Amulet (from 1826), and The Keepsake (from 1828).

engraved image of Phillis Wheatley sitting at writing desk

The poems of Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784) are read and studied by students and scholars in a variety of disciplines (American literature, African-American Studies, African Studies, and Women’s Studies), but the first edition has not previously been freely accessible in a digital facsimile without a fee or subscription. Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (London, 1773) is the first book published by an African-American author, and the frontispiece portrait of Wheatley is the only surviving work by the African-American slave artist Scipio Moorhead (born ca. 1750).

Image of clowns dancing

This collection of pamphlets is from the Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections includes three pamphlets ranging in date from 1838-1927. The topics include an oration on sexual ethics, athletic dance for men and boys and the Proceedings of the Mississippi State Colonization Society.

black and white photograph of an observatory

In 2011 Robert B. Ariail donated an extraordinary collection of historical astronomy to the University of South Carolina and the South Carolina State Museum. Over the past half-century, Mr. Ariail built a collection that encompassed both historic telescopes and astronomical instruments, now at the State Museum, and more than 5,000 rare books and other published items, now housed in the University's Irvin Department of Rare Books & Special Collections.

illustration from Robert Louis Stevenson's Kidnapped

Kidnapped, Robert Louis Stevenson’s novel about the adventures of young David Balfour, is one of the Scottish author’s most famous works. Set in eighteenth-century Scotland, Kidnapped originally appeared in serialized form in James Henderson’s literary magazine Young Folks Paper from May 1 to July 31, 1886.

woodcut illustration of a woman sitting at a writing desk

The University of South Carolina libraries have been acquiring works by Scottish authors since the early nineteenth century. With the addition of the extensive G. Ross Roy Collection in 1989, South Carolina now has major research holdings across a wide range of Scottish writing. Indeed, in the words of one recent visitor, it is "the best Burns collection in North America."

South Carolina and Civil War

A collection of photographs, manuscripts, books, and maps from the Civil War era from the University of South Carolina Libraries with essays from Dr. Thomas J. Brown and Dr. Dorothy Pratt. This collection will continue to have materials added to it.

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