Home >> Institution >> Greenville County Library System

A handmade ledger book from 1794 belonging to Alexander McBeth & Company, who began operations in Greenville County in the early 1790s. The store stood on the White Horse Road. This ledger is held by the Greenville County Library System's South Carolina Room.

Beautifying Greenville, SC

In 1907, the landscape architecture firm Kelsey & Guild, of Boston, MA, prepared a report for the Municipal League of Greenville in which they outlined, “the possibilities for beautifying and improving Greenville and…practical ways to accomplish results.”  This report, presented here in its final published version as well as the typescript version initially submitted to the League, provides a fascinating snapshot of the realities of life in Greenville over a century ago, as well as giving evidence of the early planning that went into creating the city we know today.

Bookmobile

In 1923, the Greenville Public Library converted a Ford truck into a "Library Truck." It began service to the textile mill communities in the Parker District in September of that year. The second bookmobile was built on a Dodge chassis and began serving rural areas in December 1924. After 90 years, the Greenville County Library System still reaches out to rural patrons with 11 bookmobile stops around the county.

Dixie Dairy Wagon

Photograph collection of Greenville County businesses.

Camp Sevier Soldiers

Collection of photographs and other items from World War I Camp Sevier.

Wetherill Soldiers in Formation

Collection of Camp Wetherill photographs located in Greenville in 1898.

Broom Drill Team

Photographs of Greenville County clubs, organizations, and sports.

Receipt

William Butler [1790-1850] moved to Greenville from Edgefield in 1825 where he began to practice as a country doctor. He was educated at the University of South Carolina and served as a surgeon during the War of 1812. In 1841, he was elected from Greenville District as a Whig to the twenty-seventh Congress, and eight years later he was appointed agent of the Cherokee Indians. Already in poor health, William Butler died shortly after moving to Oklahoma to assume his position. His wife, Jane T. Perry, and children moved back to Greenville.

Greenville Women's College

Institutions of higher education in Greenville County.

Woodside Building under construction

When the Woodside Building was constructed in Greenville in the early 1920s, it was a symbol of the city’s prosperity and ambition. At 17 stories it was the tallest building in the Carolinas, and could be seen on the horizon from miles away. This collection of photographs documents the building’s construction from – literally – the ground up, and includes scenes not just of construction but of Greenville’s Main Street and bits of everyday life downtown.

Pages